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Politics

University Course: Politics, History, International Relations, Economics, Philosophy, International Development

Careers: ALL! But specific careers which value a strong awareness of politics include: journalism, the Civil Service, Media, Policy Research, Local Government, Uniformed Services, the Law, charities (and many more!)


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Course Details
Type of Qualifcation: A Level
Exam Board: Edexcel
Requirements: Grade 5 in English Lit / Lang and at least a Grade 5 in a Humanities subject (History/Geography/RE)
Course Content

Autumn Year 12: We start with UK Politics, which covers concepts like democracy, political participation, voting systems, political parties, pressure groups, election campaigns and the trends in the voting behaviour of the electorate. This gives students a basis for exploring the current issues in the UK’s politics: Example Question: ‘Evaluate the view that the UK’s democracy is in crisis’.

Spring Year 12: We look at the workings of UK Government, which builds on the knowledge of the Autumn term by exploring the UK’s constitution and civil liberties, the workings of Parliament, the power of Prime Ministers, the relationship with the Devolved Regions of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and the increasing role of the Supreme Court. It also explores the UK’s complex relationship (now academic!) with the EU. This allows students to assess where power truly lies in the British political system and explore the case for further reform. (Example Question: ‘Evaluate that prime ministers have become increasingly presidential since 1979’).

Summer Year 12: We finish the first year by studying the Core Political Ideologies of Liberalism, Conservatism and Socialism. This takes students to the key ideas which inspire and inform all political issues today. They will examine the works of key political thinkers (Including Locke, Marx, Rawls and Rand). This unit stretches students to consider the view taken by the different ideologies on human nature, society, the role of the state and the economy. It also explores the tensions between ideologies. We also study a Non-Core Ideology: Nationalism. (Example Question: ‘To what extent do socialists agree with achieving equality of outcome?).

Autumn – Spring Year 13: In the final year we study the Politics and Government of the USA. This provides a nice contrast to the UK and allows students to draw comparisons between two democratic systems. Students start by gaining an understanding of the Constitution and how it shapes all aspects of US political life. They then move to cover the topics of democracy and elections, parties, Congress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court and Civil Rights.

(Example Question: ‘Evaluate the view that money is the most important factors for a successful presidential campaign’)


Style Of Assessment

All three papers are assessed through exams at the end of Year 13. There is no coursework element

Paper 1: 2 hour exam: One ‘source-based essay’ and one essay assessing UK Politics. One essay on the Core Ideologies

Paper 2: 2 hour exam: One ‘source-based essay’ and one essay assessing UK Government. One essay on the Non-Core Ideology

Paper 3: 2 hour exam: One ‘Examine’ question, one ‘Analyse’ question and an essay. All assessing US Politics

Whose kind of course?

You must already have a curiosity and love for politics!

You should be able to answer ‘yes’ to the following questions:

Do I check the news every day?

Do I follow events as they develop?

Am I able to make links between events and spot ‘big’ themes and trends?

Do I try to understand events or issues if I am not 100% informed?

Do I have an opinion about most issues? Do I share and debate these with others?

IF you can honestly say ‘yes’ to all of them, then politics will be a good choice for you!

Finally, this is a subject which is assessed through writing. Essays the majority of marks awarded so a willingness to both read and write extensively is essential.

 

Career Prospects

University Course: Politics, History, International Relations, Economics, Philosophy, International Development

Careers: ALL! But specific careers which value a strong awareness of politics include: journalism, the Civil Service, Media, Policy Research, Local Government, Uniformed Services, the Law, charities (and many more!)


History

By studying History you will be taught to understand the significance of historical events, the role of individuals in history and the nature of change over time. You will develop a deeper understanding of the past through political, social, economic and cultural perspectives. These transferable, analytical skills will serve you well in a number of different professions including:

·         Broadcasting

·         Journalism

·         Advertising

·         Law and management

·         Teaching and Lecturing

·         Research

·         Archaeology

·         Civil Service

 Public Relations

more info
Course Details
Type of Qualifcation: A Level
Exam Board: AQA
Requirements: Grade 6 or above in GCSE History recommended
Course Content
Unit 1: 1H Tsarist and Communist Russia, 1855 – 1964
Unit 2: 2S The Making of Modern Britain, 1951–2007
Unit 3: A personal study based on a topic of students choice, but the assessment must be based over a period of 100 years. It must not be on the same topic taught in Unit 1 or 2.
Style Of Assessment

A LEVEL All exams sat at the end of Year 13 and account for 80%

Both Unit 1 and 2 will consist of:

·     A written exam which is 2 hours 30 minutes

 ·     Three questions (one compulsory – source based) 80 marks - 40% of A Level

  Unit 3 (coursework):

·     Extended writing of between 3500 and 4500 words which needs to identify and investigate a period of change and continuity within a context of approximately 100 years

Whose kind of course?

History will suit you if you:

·         enjoy investigation and discovery

·         enjoy debate and putting forward a well-argued case

·         want to improve your analytical skills

·         enjoy working more independently

·         want to examine evidence and make up your own mind

·         enjoy reading

·         can express yourself clearly in extended writing

 Stretch and challenge - Aiming for A*:

·         Independent research projects and presentations

·         Inspirational guest speakers

·         Educational visits to museums and conferences

Career Prospects

By studying History you will be taught to understand the significance of historical events, the role of individuals in history and the nature of change over time. You will develop a deeper understanding of the past through political, social, economic and cultural perspectives. These transferable, analytical skills will serve you well in a number of different professions including:

·         Broadcasting

·         Journalism

·         Advertising

·         Law and management

·         Teaching and Lecturing

·         Research

·         Archaeology

·         Civil Service

 Public Relations
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